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Đọc bài viết bằng tiếng Việt tại đây.

More than a month ago, I posted an article about my food bucket list in Amsterdam with 15 Dutch food to try. I later travelled to The Netherlands for three days, tried five out of 15 plus one dish which was not in that list. Not bad?

It took me some time to arrange and edit all the pictures I’ve taken, plus working as a part-time content manager, plus full-time mother. But anyway, long story short, here it is!

What to eat in Amsterdam
and where to find ’em?

1. Stroopwafel

Stroopwafel, as you can see from its name, is a kind of waffle, but it’s not the one that you probably have known before. Unlike the Belgian waffle which is fluffy and topped with basically-whatever-you-want, stroopwafel is rather thin, soft and chewy, and EXTREMELY SWEET!

You try it, and you’ll understand why I wrote these words in capital!

Two waffles will be attached by some kind of syrup, makes it like sandwich in a way. In the old time, people will place stroopwafel on top of a hot tea or coffee cup to melt the syrup. It also makes sense to have it with a cup of tea or black coffee as you need something to balance the sweetness of the oh-so-sweet-but-so-damn-good syrup!

Where to find: At Bloemenmarkt (flower market), on the other side (not the flower shops side) you’ll find a souvenir shop selling stroopwafel.

Price: 2 Euro

2. Dutch fries

If somebody asks me for what to eat in Amsterdam, it must be Dutch fries.

Dutch fries is, well, pommes frites (of course not French fries, duh!) in a Dutch style, which is unpeeled, thick, and topped with uncountable types of sauce for you to choose. It’s painful!

One of the most popular sauces here, I think, is sweet mayonnaise. It was recommended by the guy at the Dutch fries shop in Amsterdam, and even a guy worked at the hotel I stayed in in Antwerp (Belgium).

Where to find: I can recommend two places:

  • Close to Anne Frank House, there’s a Dutch fires stall facing Westermarkt street. Despite being in such a touristy area, this stall sells good freshly fried fries with reasonable price. Price: 2.5 Euro.
  • Manneken Pis Amsterdam, Damrak 41. They claimed to sell The Netherlands’ best fries, and as the location is very central, this place is quite crowded. I personally found the Dutch fries very good, but not *that* good to be the best in the country, to be honest! My travel mate and I bought a big portion for two with sweet mayonnaise. Price: 6 Euro (big).

3. Kibbeling

Kibbeling aka battered fried cod. It sounds like the English fish and chips, doesn’t it? Well, I guess if they make it a whole fillet in stead of small bites and sell it with some fries, then it is definitely fish and chips.

It’s a nice alternative for those who can eat raw fish like sushi, but don’t have the gut to try another raw fish dish: the Dutch herring!

Where to find: A seafood stall next to the Dutch fries one on Westermarkt street (close to Anne Frank House) or any seafood stall at Albert Cuyp Market.

Price: 4.5 Euro

4. Say… cheese!

I’ve tried Dutch cheese twice. The first time was in 2015, when my roommate travelled to Amsterdam and bought some smoked cheese. It was so delicious, especially with a cup of hot tea.

The second time was this time, when I finally travelled to Amsterdam and took a free walking tour one afternoon. They offered a spontaneous cheese tasting while touring.

I’m not a big fan of cheese, maybe because I grew up in a country where cheese is not a thing. But it’s surely nice to taste some Dutch cheese while travelling here!

Where to find: Everywhere in Amsterdam / The Netherlands!

5. Poffertjes

There must be a reason why Dutch people eat so sweet. The first thing was stroopwafel. And now it’s poffertjes.

I asked the man selling stroopwafel where to find the best poffertjes in town. He, claimed to be a true Amsterdam-er, guided me to De Carrousel, next to Heineken Museum.

Five years go I tried poffertjes for the very first time in Vietnam and felt in love with it ever since. Since I moved to live in Europe in 2014, I always wanted to travel to Amsterdam, just to taste it again. After three years, I finally made it!

I skipped breakfast, visited Rijkmuseum for the whole half day, and headed to De Carrousel with an empty stomach. It turned out to be a perfect decision, for what I got was a HUGE plate of poffertjes, entirely covered by powder sugar.

Seriously Dutch people, is powder sugar free in your country?

After five years, I finally had a chance to taste poffertjes again. It was so strange, like I’ve worked all that hard just to make it happen. Poffertjes was perfect, yet was too sweet since I ordered a hot chocolate to drink. Hot coffee could be better.

If you are concern about your sugar intake, order one dish for two.

Where to find: De Carrousel, H.M. van Randwijkplantsoen 1.

Price: 6 Euro

6. Spare ribs

This is actually not any typical Dutch food, but it’s nice to give a try. Why?

With only 11.90 Euro pp, or only 10 Euro pp after 10pm, you can eat spare ribs as much as you can. Just finish it and ask for more (if you can manage).

Spare ribs here is just like the one all over the world. Just the price and the concept that make it fun to try!

Where to find: Satellite Sports Cafe, Leidseplein 11

Price: 12 Euro pp. After 10pm: 10 Euro pp. Unlimited.

7. Herring

Dutch raw herring is one of the dishes that makes the name of Dutch food. You can either eat it like it is, with onion and pickled cucumber, or have it in a sandwich.

I cannot review this one as I didn’t try it. But here is what my Vietnamese friend who lives in Amsterdam said about her experience with herring:

For the first time – just wanted to throw up; the second time – tried her best to swallow; the third time – “OK, I’m fine!”; from that time on – she nailed it!

Source: Shutterstock

Where to find: Any fish or seafood stall on the street or Albert Cuyp Market.

Price: 2.5 Euro

How about you? Have you tried any Dutch food,
or do you have any recommendation for what to eat in Amsterdam?
Please feel free to share your experiences by leaving a comment below!

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The author: Misa Gjone

Hi there! I'm Quyen “Misa” Gjone, a freelance travel writer born and raised in Vietnam, got married to a Viking from Norway, and currently live in the countryside outside Oslo. I'm the founder and chief chronicler of Misa's Travel Blog.

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